Scheduling a Program

Scheduling a Program with William Penn House

Our connections to community organizations allow us to introduce you to DC in a way you may have never seen it before.  We work with groups of all ages to tailor single and multi-day programs for people coming to Washington, DC. From advocacy on Capitol Hill with the Friends Council on National Legislation (FCNL) to serving breakfast to neighbors experiencing homelessness, our programs approach social issues from multiple angles.

We work with group sizes of 8-30 people. The rates vary depending on program intensity and size. Please contact us to learn more.

Please remember that many groups book their lodging and programs 12 -18 months in advance. To schedule your program, contact Program Coordinator Naomi Madaras at naomi@williampennhouse.org.

 

Reflection

After an intensive day of service-learning, reflection is key to processing and unpacking group experiences. While the focus of individual programs vary, our programs all include time for a facilitated discussion to accompany the hands-on daily activities. William Penn House staff help to create a learning experience during reflection time to allow participants to work through emotions, to question preconceptions, and to learn from one another in a safe, open dialogue.

 

Below are some sample program schedules to spark your imagination. By no means are these programs all-encompassing of the available opportunities! Please keep in mind that as the community needs change, so do the service opportunities. We work with participants’ preferences and our community partners’ needs to insure a reciprocal and mutually beneficial experience for all.

 

Sample Program 1: Hunger and Homelessness in the Nation’s Capital

  • Daily service-learning experiences with soup kitchens, food pantries, and outreach organizations for populations experiencing homelessness
  • Afternoon projects on urban farms and city gardens
  • Evening reflections on the connections between affordable food, health and wellbeing, and the root causes of urban homelessness

 

Sample Program 2: Racial Justice and Affordable Housing

  • Tour of DC’s historic Shaw neighborhood focused on gentrification, affordable housing, and re-zoning in the District of Columbia
  • Daily seminars with advocacy organizations for immigrant rights, communities of color, and anti-racist initiatives
  • Lobby training with FCNL’s Immigration and Refugee office
  • Day-long experience at the National Museum of African American History & Culture

 

Sample Program 3: Environmental Sustainability in Urban Neighborhoods

  • Service projects with conservation organizations along the Anacostia river
  • Hands-on farming with urban gardens and orchards in southeast DC
  • Gleaning and food distribution on nearby Maryland farms
  • Meetings with community organizations dedicated to providing affordable food in the “food deserts” of DC